Lighting

What do people use for lighting? Do you use batteries or generators? We would like soft lighting, but lighting to read by. Thanks

All battery powered in our 5m bell. A generator would be noisy. If we need something specific (e.g. reading small fonts) we do have torches but in general we find fairy lights, fake candles and a fire to do the job most of the time.

1 Like

3 candles is enough to read fairly clearly, Although you end up squinting a bit if they’re flickering, enclosed lanterns help.

Otherwise if you want something portable mage lights are a thing, and anything not too modern looking will work, various disguised battery lights available, some brighter than others.

I also have a very small LED light I can hide in my hand, which is useful for reading song words around a campfire.

Generators I suspect would need to be OK’d with site crew if allowed as they would need to know where possible fire risks and fuel storage are for safety reasons.

1 Like

Some people use candles, oil-lamps and the like.

Magical glowing crystals (“glowstones”) are mentioned on the wiki as being common throughout the Empire (though originally invented in Urizen). So people tend to represent those using LED lights dressed up appropriately.

Definitely batteries not generators.

Inside that tent: Battery powered tea light, some tall candles set to constant light (yes I only found that out at the last event), and a flat round LED light within a a lamp (strung high on a central hook). This normally gives enough light to read and make notes

Outside the tent: Small red LED flash on the end of a wand, and a small LED flash light strapped to the underside of a bracer (before I had this, I was constantly tripping over guy ropes, sorry anybody that I woke up)

For carried light, LED juggling balls are fairly good for ‘Glowstones’. They don’t look too much like obvious torches and give a nice flat light. They’re also usefully palm sizedso you can use your hand as shade.

Mine also have a screw switch which if you get it just right means you can turn it on or off with a simple queeze and it’ll turn off if you hand it to someone who doesn’t know how it works which is fun.

They’re also fairly cheap on ebay.

2 Likes

I love the LED juggling ball idea; that’s brilliant.

I also have a hurricane lantern with a copper surround that looks just about IC enough to pass: http://www.diy.com/departments/blooma-magnes-copper-external-led-storm-lantern/1277400_BQ.prd

For about £15-20 White Rose Apparel (who sell on field) do fantastic battery glow stone lights which come in clear or coloured and look really atmospheric. Image from Facebook .

I recommend. I have one in clear, and it gives a decent amount of light (the coloured ones if memory serves are less powerful in terms of light reach. (They last a good few events before they need a little crossbill screwdriver to open them up and change the battery.)

2 Likes

Another vote for LEDs. In plot we get a lot of use out of LED lanterns and candles. Battery operated, provide a reasonable amount of light and don’t present any fire hazard if you forget to blow them out.

Additional to what does/doesn’t work, PD doesn’t allow generators other than their own on the field.
This is for two reasons.

First off, the small generators that people are most likely to have available to them are usually small petrol generators, which have a somewhat shrill engine note, which carries a long way. They are rarely sound deadened. The generator we hire is a large, low-note rumbly diesel set with lots of sound dampening fitted to it, and if I could hire a quieter one, I would. Lots of little generators around the field is absolutely something we want to avoid.

The other thing is safety, both practical safety and the safety regulations. If we’ve got people with generators running on unleaded, then we start to have to think about the Petroleum (Consolidation) Regulations 2014 and all manner of things like that. If people want to run little camping stoves that use unleaded, that’s one thing, but as soon as people have generators and jerry cans full of petrol, we will have the safety officers looking over our shoulder quick as you like. Add camp fires into the mix, and it becomes a lot simpler and safer to just have PD’s one big genset in its roped-off OC area with the bunded diesel tank.

Also, when you can get sets of LEDs that run off a USB power bank that will quite happily last 2 evenings, and fit in a pocket of your kit bag, why bother carting a generator around? :slight_smile:

Sparky Dave

Thanks for all the responses! We’ve sorted out a battery to run things off of.