Cloaks recommendations

Where should I source a cloak from I’d like it to be water proof? Any suggestions where to look would help a lot

Chow’s is generally a solid option. She’s generally trading at events.

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I would look at getting wool and not “fleece” material. Its warmer, better at keeping wind out and easier to clean the mud off.

Edit Wool cloaks are more of an investment but one I think I think I will make very soon.

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Fully waterproof you’re after waxed cotton, or synthetic. Be aware waxed cotton is heavy and requires maintenance to stay waterproof, synthetics are easily damaged by stray fire sparks and may not look the part, or keep you warm.

Actual wool will keep you warm, even if wet, can be washed, or may even only need the mud brushed off once dry, and will keep out everything but really solid rain.

I was warm and dry in my melton cloak this event just gone.

Plenty of the traders do wool cloaks, Ceolred Monger does a choice of colours in good wool, plenty of the costume sewers can make you up something specific to your characters needs.

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James, a very historical, cheap and totally overlooked waterproof cloth you can make yourself is “oilskin”. It’s literally cotton canvas and a bottle of boiled linseed oil. Both cost literally a few quid. The (pre)boiled oil polymerises during oxidation whilst drying, making a rubbery flexible residue impregnated in the cloth. The oil comes from hardware shops. The cloth comes from a charity bin.

  1. make cloth onto a cape/cloak … lots of patterns out there. He’ll, even an old bed sheet chopped with scissors and hand-stitched with a needle and thread will do!
  2. put cape into a plastic tub, pour boiled linseed oil from the bottle into tub … glug glug glug. Massage and squish it.
  3. hang it out to dry for 3 days. Pour un-used oil back into bottle and re-seal.
  4. repeat once more.
    Finished cape weighs about 2-3 pounds, is uber waterproof, super cheap, looks authentic and rustic, and is utterly historical.
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gussie88bunny describes Oilcloth - Wikipedia
which is broadly similar to the modern-day waxed-cotton stuff: Waxed cotton - Wikipedia
I imagine that both of those would burn rather well and easily though, so be careful around fires.

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Remember also that whilst most good woollen cloaks (I only use woollen) are in dull colours blues, browns, black etc, you can easily pimp them with braid, broaches, patches etc

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I just found Velvet Glove has a “waterproof items” section:
http://www.velvet-glove.co.uk/index.php?COLLCC=2932492231&page=13
(And I’m sure they’d make you one with a wool lining if you prefer that to the listed options of cotton, polysomething or fleece).

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Yep … sparks sizzle little holes quite easily.
Fire caution is a good pointer, cheers.
With appropriate awareness and care, oilcloth can be safely worn.

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